Wheaton Labs Rocket Mass Heater Jamboree 2021

So the Mad Farmer just got back from the Rocket Mass Heater Jamboree that took place at Wheaton Labs. If you are not familiar with Wheaton Labs it is the place where Paul Wheaton, the Duke of Permaculture (Paul was given that title by Geoff Lawton), holds his events and experiments with all things permaculture, natural building and cool technology, like the Rocket Mass Heaters.

The RMH Jamboree was a nine day event that took place in early October with multiple instructors and multiple build tracks.

Kirk ‘Donkey’ Mobert was there:

Sky Huddleston, the inventor of the only UL listed shippable Rocket Mass Heater core, the Liberator:

Chris ‘Uncle Mud’ McClellan

Also instructing were Rodney Morgan, Isaac Workman, Christina Keegan and of course, Paul Wheaton himself. Several instructors scheduled to be attending had visa issues, and other various things that came up so were unable to attend. All things considered, there were a lot of people there and a lot of things going on.

Sky brought one of his Liberator RMH cores to install at the shop and a Bulgarian Gamera RMH was sent to the lab for installation and testing. Sadly the Gamera inventors were unable to get clearance to come to the event but I did get to say “hello” to one of them over a video chat that Uncle Mud was having. Both the Liberator and the Gamera are very cool stoves and I will be posting more about them in future posts.

Over the course of the nine days there were quite a number of projects that were started and most of them completed.

  • Sky installed his Liberator into the Shop and performed the initial install of the Gamera into the Red Cabin (one of the rentable buildings at the Lab).
  • Uncle Mud took on a Rocket Heater Assisted Solar Dehydrator and a rebuild of the pebble mass bench in the Red Cabin where the Gamera was installed.
  • Donkey Mobert tested a Rocket Kiln concept and started work on a portable 8 inch Rocket Engine that can be “plugged into” various types of experiments, the kiln, a forge and anything else Paul can dream up.
  • Christina led the build of a Rocket Sauna and installed a smaller Rocket Mass Heater into a small WOFATI (Woodland Oehler-style Freaky-Cheap Annualized Thermal Inertia) home for one of the boots (more on that program in other posts).
  • Isaac led the build of an eight-inch Pebble-style Rocket Mass Heater in the new Solarium
  • Rodney led the build of a Lorena-style Rocket Cooktop and outdoor kitchen, repaired the electric “Bad Boy Buggy” and lent his myriad areas of expertise to many of the other on-ongoing projects.
  • Special Mention for Jamboree attendee JR who designed and replaced the plumbing in the Rocket Heated showers!
Lorena Rocket Mass Cook Stove

That’s a brief overview of what was going on. In future posts the Mad Farmer will do a deeper dive into the individual projects and what it’s like to visit the Lab (this was my second trip and boy did things change in just three years)!

If you can’t wait that long you can always go sign up at Permies.com and check out all the things happening a Wheaton Labs.

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TSL Cocktail of the Month – Corpse Reviver #1 October 2021

Happy Halloween month! The Mad Farmer and Miss Mercy had a crazy amount of technical difficulties on our FB live and so there was a little lag on the video and this one was from the camera. We will continue to work on the AV issues and hopefully, as we go forward, move to a different platform that is more stable.

On to our cocktail, the Corpse Reviver #1! This cocktail has a spirited history – see what I did there – and has been around since the late 1800s! It was a diverse group of mixed drinks that were used as “hair of the dog” remedies. Miss Mercy found on books.google.com a copy of The Gentleman’s Table Guide by E. Ricket and C. Thomas from 1871. Pg. 45 offers recipe No. 92 and says: Use a wineglass 1/2 of brandy, 1/2 of Maraschino and 2 dashes of Boker’s bitters. In the late 19th century and early 20th century being in need of a Corpse Reviver was an indicator that a person had had a night out on the town the night before.

VintageAmericanCocktails.com gives a great history of the drink and Harry Craddock, the bartender credited with putting the drink in The Savoy Cocktail Book. The recipe listed in the article is from the 1934 version of the book. We used the recipe from Liquor.com more closely resembles the recipe the 1930 version of the book.

Corpse Reviver #1 from the 1930s Savoy Cocktail Book by Harry Craddock

1/4 Italian Vermouth

1/4 Apple Brandy or Valvado

1/2 Brandy

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass. To be taken before 11 a.m., or whenever steam and energy are needed and the recipe is:

Corpse Reviver #2 from the 1930s Savoy Cocktail Book by Harry Craddock

1/4 wineglass lemon juice

1/4 wineglass Kina lillet

1/4 wineglass Cointreau

1/4 wineglass Dry Gin

1 dash of Absinthe

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Four of these taken in swift succession will unrevive the corpse again.

Corpse Reviver #1 – Here is the recipe we used from Liquor.com:

1 oz Cognac – we used Meukow

1 oz Calvados – we used Calvados Selection

1/2 oz of Sweet Vermouth – we used Martini and Rossi

Add all ingredients to a mixing glass and add ice. Stir and strain into a cocktail glass.

Miss Mercy also mentioned a bonus Halloween themed cocktail during our video and it’s a Skeleton Key – this was a tasty follow up! Here is the recipe we used.

Skeleton Key – our recipe is from The Spruce Eats

1 1/4 oz bourbon whiskey

3/4 oz elderberry liquor

1/2 oz fresh squeezed lemon juice

3 to 5 oz of ginger beer

8 dashes of bitters

Build bourbon, elderflower liquor and lemon juice in a collins glass with ice. Top with ginger beer and garnish with bitters.

Happy Halloween to everyone!

TSL Cocktail of the month – Bumbo September 2021

Ahoy matey! We’re happy to greet you on Talk like a Pirate day and share a new, however old, cocktail with you on such a fun day. After a few (not so good) pirate jokes, Miss Mercy shared a bit about how Talk like a Pirate day came to be. It was created in 1995 by a couple of friends, John Baur and Mark Summer, in Albany, OR. In 2002 the friends wrote to columnist Dave Barry and he promoted the day. Now it is celebrated all over.

What would be a great drink for such an auspicious day? A pirate themed drink of course! Pirate Grog is a very common pirate drink and usually is just watered down rum. Bumbo was identified as an updated version of Grog that can be made to the drinker’s taste. That seems like it would b a good thing, right? So we decided to try Bumbo. It was something. Here is the recipe we used:

Bumbo – recipe from: https://www.tastemade.com/articles/6-drinks-that-are-sure-to-bring-out-the-pirate-in-you/

  • 2 oz Dark Rum
  • 1 oz Lemon Juice
  • 1/2 tsp Grenadine
  • 1/4 tsp (grated) Nutmeg

In a shaker half-filled with ice cubes, combine all of the ingredients. Shake well. Strain into a cocktail glass.

I would say the Mad Farmer and Miss Mercy were unprepared for the flavor of this pirate inspired drink – although the Mad Farmer thought it might keep you from getting scurvy.

Our First Paw Paw

TSL Homestead Paw Pas Trees

So it’s past the mid-point of Summer, and you can start to see the days become shorter (just a little) and things are coming on strong in the garden and the weeds are making an effort to take over and rule the land (and in some cases, succeeding). At the start of the garden season it was very cold, then very wet, then hot – not really the best start for growing things. Because the Mad Farmer is a chaos gardener (more about that in future posts), he threw caution to the wind and planted Tomatoes (the diva of the garden), Cucumbers, and, because I’m a perpetual optimist, Squash (curses, you squash borers).

Tomatoes are doing great. A neighbor who doesn’t particularly care for tomatoes but is happy to watch us try, allowed us to plant along a shared chain-link fence line. Those tomatoes are going gang-busters. One Tatume (also called Calabacita) squash managed to put out one early squash and one fall squash (Sidenote: Tatume is an awesome squash and can be used when young just like a zucchini or yellow squash and if allowed to getter bigger can replace a butternut or winter squash). So overall, like normal in Zone 6a, hit or miss on a lot of what got planted.

The most positive thing (okay, I’m sure this isn’t a spoiler because of the title of the post) our very first Paw Paw fruit! The Farmer first tasted a Paw Paw at a Rocket Oven Kickstarter reward event that took place at Wheaton Labs. Michael Judd, the author of “For the Love of Paw Paws” sent a box of Paw Paws to Wheaton Labs in honor of Paul’s support for Michael’s Kickstarter. If you have never had a Paw Paw it’s hard to describe the taste. Most people describe it as a strawberry-banana custard, it’s pretty close to that but better in the Farmer or Miss Mercy’s opinion. Suffice it to say, it’s good. Why can’t you get it in the store? Because it’s ripe for about three days and then you are all done. It doesn’t travel well, but it is great in Ice Cream (ask us how we know)…

So, when are Paw Paw’s ripe you ask? Great Question, the best answer I’ve seen so far is “if you shake the tree and the fruit falls off” (thanks Nicole Sauce)! At our Urban Homestead we had to place a small nylon bag around the fruit to keep the squirrels from getting them all, so our first Paw Paw fell into the bag. Miss Mercy was pretty excited when she brought the first Paw Paw into the house.

Inside of our first Paw Paw

Size-wise it was not the biggest Paw Paw I have ever seen but it sure was cute. When we sliced it open and tried it the flavor was very good. We also got quite a few seeds, which the Farmer is going to stratify (cold storage in the fridge over winter) and plant in the spring to see if we can get some more Paw Paws to grow.

Overall, a great experiment and we liked it so much we planted two more for a total of five! I guess we are now Paw Paw people!

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TSL Cocktail of the month – Raspberry Beret August 2021

Our cocktail of the month for August is a hat tip to one of Miss Mercy’s favorite artists – Prince! We decided to take advantage of a wonderful gift from our Pacific Northwest cousin, a bottle of Raspberry Liquor from Skip Rock Distillers in Snohomish, WA. Their website includes a nice list of products including a rye whiskey and a potato vodka.

Miss Mercy discovered two different recipes for the Raspberry Beret and so we decided to try both of them. We found the first recipe to be pleasantly refreshing. The second recipe we thought was a great dessert drink. If you decide to give either of these a try, let us know what you think!

Raspberry Beret #1 – from www.cointreau.com

1.5 oz. Cointreau

.5 oz fresh lime juice

3 fresh raspberries

.5 oz egg whites

1.5 oz soda water

Combine all ingredients apart from the soda water in a cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake until well chilled. Strain into a chilled coupe glass. Top with soda water and garnish with raspberry.

Raspberry Beret #2 – from https://www.barnonedrinks.com/drinks/r/raspberry-beret-2-4080.html

1 oz. Raspberry Vodka

1 oz. Bailey’s Irish Cream

1/2 oz. of Raspberry Liquor

2 oz. cream

1 splash of Grenadine

Blend with 8 ice cubes. Pour in a glass rimmed with red-colored sugar, top with whip cream and sprinkle with red colored sugar.

Homestead Mishaps

Sometimes stupid happens – sometimes it’s preventable, sometimes it’s an accident and sometimes it’s not knowing there is still chain link fence inside a tree stump (you can decide which category that falls into gentle reader). So the Mad Farmer is typing this post with with one less working finger than the last post, bringing up a great time to talk about first aid on the homestead.

First we will tell the tale of woe on the homestead. One of the recent projects on our list has been to reconfigure the fence around our urban property to put a gate into the “back 40” so we have easier access to an easement area and can also put a little more privacy around our back yard. New readers may not know this but several years ago when we built the Pub Shack the area was overgrown with scrub trees that we had cut down to make space for the Shack. Some of the stumps were still producing a lot of new growth (great if you are coppicing for fodder, not great for using the space for pumpkins) so before the fence gets extended the stumps have to go.

Turns out over the years before we bought the property some of the trees had grown up around and through the chain link fence that used to be on that section of the property. Turns out some of that chain link is inside the stumps but barely, or not at all, visible when looking at the stump. So in the interest of getting the project done the Farmer was paying a little less attention that perhaps was warranted, resulting in a sudden twist of a shovel handle and the rapid acceleration of the handle into the top bar of a partially existing chain link fence. As it turned out the Farmer’s little finger was not nearly as sturdy as either the shovel handle or the chain link fence rail. This sad state of affairs provided the Farmer with a spectacular attention-getting moment, a few choice words and a trip to the Minor Med to check out the problem.

Some folks may or may not know the Mad Farmer is a Kansas Certified Emergency Preparedness Instructor, which in theory should mean he knows a little more about first aid than the average Joe walking down the street. In reality it means that the Farmer set the bone without putting any real thought into if that was the right thing to do (it probably wasn’t), realized that he might go into shock (a possibility), so should have Miss Mercy drive him to get everything checked out (probably his best idea under trying circumstances). So, finger in a cup of crushed ice and off to the Minor Med we go.

So a couple of X-Rays and an hour later and the Farmer finds out that not only did he break his little finger (spoiler alert – he already knew that) but it turned out to be a “compound fracture”. In case you are not current on your first-aid-speak, a compound fracture is when the broken bone breaks the skin and allows the outside world inside access. Not the best thing ever according to the Doc. Usually there isn’t much to be done for broken digits, typically they tape them to the next closest finger and that’s about it. In this case the Farmer got a shiny new splint, an antibiotic prescription and a prescription for pain killers. Keeping the finger on ice kept the swelling down initially but boy howdy, did it start to throb after a while.

So to make a long story slightly shorter, broken bones usually take 6-8 weeks to heal. Fingers and toes can take longer because they typically aren’t immobilized completely and if you are not a Spring Chicken (and the Farmer is the other side of Spring at this point) it can take even longer than normal. So that this time, 10 weeks in, the finger is out of the splint, has been seen by a specialist who says it’s healing okay and the Farmer is mainly experiencing stiffness in the joint. Turns out you do use your little finger more than you might think so most of the homestead projects ground to a screeching halt while the finger was healing.

Good news is that the finger is mostly useable at this point, so with a little more care the projects will be moving forward again.

TSL Homestead Cocktail of the month – Egg Nog July 2021

This month the video is from our camera angle, so there is some behind the scenes dialogue between the Mad Farmer and Miss Mercy as we were figuring out the Facebook ‘go live’ feature. This is the same feature we struggled with last month. Hopefully we will get all that sorted.

Now, on to the July Cocktail of the month – Egg Nog! We decided to do a little Christmas in July here at the homestead and nothing says holidays like Egg Nog (according to Miss Mercy).

This was a fun cocktail to research and fun to make. The recipe I used was from my 1941 Boston Cooking School Cookbook by Fannie Merritt Farmer. The first edition of this book came out in 1896, and the earliest edition I have is 1912. The 1941 book is the first one in which this eggnog recipe appears, as far as I could tell. As a side note, a very similar recipe is included in Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts, published in 1949.

Known during the medieval period as ‘posset’, it was made with hot milk curdled with ale, wine or something similar and then sweetened and spices added. Because of the high cost of ingredients, it was a drink enjoyed by the upper class. How the drink came to be called Egg Nog is a bit of a mystery. One possibility of its origin comes from the wooden cup used to drink it was called a “noggin”. Egg Nog was a pretty common drink in England and the United States by the 1700s. Here in states, we swapped out the alcohol for some that was not being taxed. Read more from the History Kitchen from PBS.

One of the more sensational notes about our cocktail this month comes in the story of the Egg Nog riot of 1826. This riot took place at West Pointe – and it was a doozy. The Superintendent of the school had forbade the consumption of alcohol by the cadets, which really put a wrench in their traditional Christmas celebrations which included spiked Egg Nog. The cadets spiked the Egg Nog and things, as they say, escalated. Cadets were expelled and Christmas celebrations were no more. Smithsonian Magazine had quite an article about the riot, which you can find here.

I am a big fan of Egg Nog, even more so now that I have this delicious recipe to make. It makes 5 quarts, which does sound like a lot, but it goes surprisingly quick! And while not everyone enjoys the tasty drink, as a country we manage to drink 15 million gallons of it during the winter holiday season.

If you decide to give this recipe a try, do let us know what you think!

Virginia Egg Nog – The Boston Cooking School Cook Book by Fannie Merritt Farmer

12 eggs

12 eggs

1 cup sugar

1 quart milk

2 cups whisky (we used Weller Special Reserve)

1 cup rum (we used Bacardi light rum)

1 quart heavy cream, beaten

Beat egg yolks with sugar until very light. Add milk, whisky, and rum. Fold in cream and egg whites, beaten until very stiff. Add more sugar or liquor to taste. Serve very cold with grated nutmeg on each cup. Makes 5 quarts.

Enjoy!

TSL Homestead Cocktail of the month – Harvey Wallbanger June 2021

This was our second attempt recording this video as Facebook made some changes to its “go live” function. Pretty sure we still don’t know what we are doing! We managed to get something recorded though.

Our TSL Homestead Cocktail of the month was chosen by the Mad Farmer in celebration of Father’s Day. The Harvey Wallbanger became popular in the 1970’s . Here is an interesting post on the history of the drink. It was fairly extensive, albeit a little underwhelming. It provided the ridiculous tag line “Harvey Wallbanger is the name and I can be made!”

The Harvey Wallbanger is a dressed up version of a screwdriver – the dress being Galliano. Galliano has a licorice like flavor and is yellow. The bottle says it has over 30 herbs and spices – seems like maybe there could have been a different note to bring out instead of licorice. A little surprisingly, it does add a nice flavor to the drink. However, if you are not a fan of licorice, you may want to stick to the screwdriver.

We took our recipe from the Galliano site and you can find it here. If you give this cocktail a try, let us know what you think!

Please, drink responsibly and get into the spirit of things!

State of the Greenhouse – May 16, 2021

Greenhouse Walk-Through
Looking into the greenhouse from the deck

So we’ve made some significant progress on the TSL Homestead greenhouse. We’re not finished by a long shot but the space is now completely enclosed and mostly draft proof. As you can see in the photo above we’ve got the outside trimmed in weathered shiplap siding that was gifted to us by some friends a few years ago when we were building the Pub Shack (thanks Mike & Wanda)! The siding didn’t match the cedar siding we were using on the Shack so I kept it back to use in a future project and, TADAAAA, we used it!

The planting tables have been installed

We installed planting tables along the front wall at two different heights. The longer run, about 10 feet, is lower and a good height for working at if seated and it’s also an advantage if you are just sitting in the space and looking out into the yard. The Mad Farmer and Miss Mercy have spent more than a few evenings since we got the roof on sitting in the greenhouse, discussing modifications, changes to our yard and just enjoying the space. The higher table on the West end is 36 inches high, a good height for standing and working, and about 6 feet long.

The planking for the interior walls and the table tops are recycled cedar pickets from old garden fence that we used to have up when we had more of the garden blocked off.

Inside looking West

The greenhouse is close to one of our outside spigots so we put a splitter on the outlet and ran a short hose behind the greenhouse and through the back wall, giving us water inside the greenhouse without having to drag a hose around. A 25 foot hose with a wand attachment was the perfect length to allow us to water anything inside and not have to deal with a lot of excess hose.

You can see our existing cold frames in the background but we’re going to be moving those to allow for easier access along the path to the greenhouse door.

Looking out into the vegetable garden. It’s fenced in because Sasha likes brassicas, especially Brussel Sprouts.
Inside looking South out into the yard

We haven’t had too much sun yet this year but we have already been super happy that most of the windows open.

It’s a nice space to sit in when the weather outside is damp and dreary

The Mad Farmer really wasn’t happy with the way I originally framed the East door leading into the greenhouse from the deck. The original plan for the East wall looked a lot different and when we ended up making it symmetrical and using slightly larger windows it narrowed the door frame. We were using an older screen door so that we could raise and lower the window but the opening became too narrow for the stock door so ended up initially framing the door on the outside of the greenhouse, opening onto the deck. After walking through it a few days I just didn’t like it.

So, because screws are a Farmer’s best friend, I was able to deconstruct the door and re-purpose most of the frame. I cut notches into the edges of the door frames using a table saw. You lower the blade down to the height you want to cut to and then run your wood through multiple times, widening the table guide a little each time to make the notch wider. You can do the same thing better with a router but I need to replace my router so sometimes you do the best you can with what you have.

After notching the rails I cut them in half, placed the glass from the door into the custom notches and screwed the top halves back on. I’m sure there are better ways to do it, and it’s possible down the road I might replace it, but it works fine, fits with the look of the greenhouse and I will eventually build a screen door in a similar manner that will open onto the deck so we can have the door open and still keep the bugs out.

The greenhouse dimensions are about 16 feet long by 8 feet wide – a nice space to move around in without feeling cramped.
The steps lead up to the deck where Sasha likes to keep watch for squirrels and Sasquatch

We made the steps leading down into the greenhouse off the deck wider and shallower than a normal step, to make it easier to step down if you are carrying something. The distance between the deck and the ground is only about 15-16 inches, so they didn’t have to be steep and it’s easier on both the dog and the people – important as you get older. Sasha is nine now and while she thinks like a puppy she doesn’t move that well anymore.

We are going to be insulating the wall spaces and covering the interior walls that are open but the good news is that we have some time before winter so we can start looking for some additional salvaged lumber to fit the look. We the price of new lumber at the moment if we decide to go that route we’ll have to decide which child to sell. Father Day’s coming up kids, so would be a good time to make some points with the old man before that decision takes place…

TSL Homestead Cocktail of the Month – Mint Julep May 2021

The first Saturday in May is the Kentucky Derby so the Mad Farmer and I thought it would be fun to do a Mint Julep for our May cocktail. We were busy the first Saturday in May, so we did not watch the Kentucky Derby. However, not watching does not equal not celebrating 😉

Since there is an event tied to the cocktail this month, right out of the gate it seemed reasonable to do a bit of research on the race and the drink. So first, a little information on the Derby.

The Derby was started by Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr., grandson of William Clark of the William and Clark expedition [An interesting book about the Lewis and Clark expedition is called: Or Perish in the Attempt: Wilderness Medicine in the Lewis and Clark Expedition by Dr. David J. Peck. While it is out of print, you may be able to find a used copy]. Clark modeled the Kentucky Derby on the derby held at Epsom Downs, in England, that he saw while traveling abroad. That derby was started in 1780 by the 12th earl of Derby. The first Kentucky Derby was held in 1875 at Churchill Downs race track in Louisville, KY. The race is 3 year old thoroughbreds racing 1.25 miles. The original distance was 1.5 miles but was changed in 1896 after complaints that the distance was too long. It is the longest running sports event in the country.

In 1884, Clark gave the winner of the Derby roses. This tradition continued and in 1925 a sports writer dubbed the race the ‘Run for the Roses’ and it stuck. Later, in the 1930s, the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness Stakes, and the Belmont Stakes were grouped together and called the Triple Crown. And, while everyone may not be familiar with the Preakness or the Belmont, most folks know that the Kentucky Derby is known for extravagant hats and mint juleps!

Well, it turns out that the julep has a very different beginning than what we currently know as the mint julep. For starters, it used to just be a julep., no mint – or bourbon. They were typically rum, water and sugar. The word julep is derived from a Persian word then it went to Arabic and then Latin and eventually we got to julep. The original Persian word meant sweetened rosewater. Early juleps were made with cognac or other French brandies. Sadly, an infection of grapevines in France in the mid 1880’s and an excise tax on American made brandies made whiskey the staple for the julep after the Civil War. The first reference to mint julep goes back to 1784 when they were used as medicine. The first print mention of the mint julep is 1803 in the book by John Davis called Travels of Four and a Half Years in the United States of America.

Fast forward a little bit, 1938 – and we find the mint julep becoming the official drink of the Kentucky Derby. Fast forward a bit more, 2015, and we find Old Forrester being the official whiskey. They serve 120,000 mint juleps at the Derby – yes, 120,000. The race is one lap around a track. I can’t imagine how many it would be if it were two!

Hope you have enjoyed our stroll through the history of the Kentucky Derby and its official drink, the mint julep. We are including two recipes for your enjoyment, one with cognac, and one with Old Forrester. If you have the time, mint, and patience, do make the mint simple syrup – it is delicious!

Please, drink responsibly, and get into the spirit of things!

The Old Forester Mint Julep Recipe from KentuckyDerby.com

·         2 cups sugar

·         2 cups water

·         Sprigs of fresh mint

·         Crushed ice

·         Old Forester Straight Bourbon Whisky

Make a simple syrup by boiling sugar and water together for five minutes. Cool and place in a covered container with six or eight sprigs of fresh mint, then refrigerate overnight.

Make one julep at a time by filling a julep cup with crushed ice, adding one tablespoon mint syrup and two ounces of Old Forester Kentucky Whisky.

Garnish with a sprig of fresh mint.

Cognac Mint Julep from Hennessy.com

1.75 oz Cognac

8 mint leaves

.5 oz simple syrup

1 fresh mint branch to garnish

Place the mint leaves in a tall julep glass and gently press the mint leaves with a pestle (or spoon) to release the oils. Add the simple syrup and cognac. Stir completely and finish with crushed ice. Garnish with mint.